Rob WhelanAdminRob Whelan (Admin, eMusicTheory)

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      3 comments  ·  General  ·  Admin →
      Rob WhelanAdminRob Whelan (Admin, eMusicTheory) commented  · 

      This is an idea I haven't run into before -- do you have any thoughts on how a drill like this might work? That is, what would a question be, and what would the student have to enter to answer it?

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        16 comments  ·  General  ·  Admin →

        i’m working on a Scale Degrees drill where you give the responses in solfege — I think that’ll address this pretty well. The drill will establish the key (playing or showing the tonic note or chord of the scale, for example) then play or show a random note — and you’ll select what scale degree it is (solfege syllable, or number).

        Rob WhelanAdminRob Whelan (Admin, eMusicTheory) commented  · 

        I don't know much about the James Jordan method -- are there any good online resources for it (I'm coming up with mostly book references at the moment)? Or -- tell me a little more about what a drill to reinforce his concepts might look like.

        I do have a drill under development that uses solfege, actually -- "scale degrees", where you use solfege syllables or numbers to identify scale degrees, either by ear or on the staff. This sounds like it might fit in with what you're looking for.

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